Tag Archives | real drama for learning

How to avoid boredom by committee – Drama script reviews

Posted by Tom Hickmore, 22nd August, 2017
script writing, video drama, video know-how

“You’re making some dramatized video for learning. The script you’ve produced is fantastic… Then the first feedback comes from the client and they’ve added a great chunk of unspeakable dialogue and taken out the best bits… Of course, they know their culture and they know their business, but what they don’t know is that their amendments will make their video less effective.”

Tom on how to manage the script feedback process.

Goodies and Baddies – Drama doesn’t have to be black and white

Posted by Tom Hickmore, 26th June, 2017
video drama, video know-how

When we say a drama needs to be based on a conflict, and that involves a protagonist and an antagonist, it brings to mind a hard-nosed clash that you’ve seen with Batman versus the Joker or James Bond shooting at Goldfinger.  This can sound alarm bells.  While such whizzbang, violent conflicts are great fun to do, they’re not usually what we seek in the world of corporate drama.  The next models that come to mind are perhaps soap operas and other more human-scale dramas.  But even these frequently feature stand-up rows and tears, not the sort of thing we can usually entertain.

The fact remains, however, that to articulate a story in drama, conflict is essential, and the starting point is a protagonist and an antagonist.  So, how can we make these characters realistic, but nevertheless credible in dramatic terms?

The protagonist and antagonist want the same thing, but disagree on how to achieve it.  In a corporate context, this could be two people trying to solve a problem at work with one following the received wisdom on the topic and the other stubbornly doing it their own way.  Depending on whether it’s a compliance drama or one about innovation, one of them is the protagonist and the other the antagonist.  They are both working for the good of the employer, but one is misguided, the other struggling to do the right thing.  In this little conflict, neither is really a goodie or a baddie, but one is a protagonist, who advances the cause of the drama, the other the antagonist who stands in the way of the correct working method being enacted.

The most important thing about the protagonist/antagonist structure in a learning drama is that the protagonist can champion the right way to do things without seeming to lecture the audience.  To do the right thing they need to fight for what they believe in.  Whereas if they just tell us what they believe, they come across as merely a rather boring conformist.

Of course, the protagonist doesn’t necessarily have to fight against another character, the antagonist could be a setting a process or an idea.  If our protagonist is trying to conquer a task we could tell the story like a sports movie.  Sport is a vehicle for the participant to objectify an internal struggle.  And this is how the drama is constructed.  It’s an inner struggle, articulated through the mechanisms of sport, which takes place amidst a variety of antagonistic outer forces which together form a collective “antagonist”.  So you could say the antagonist is a multi-headed beast – several characters and events that block the protagonist.  (Of course, I’m only talking about one common model of sports movie here, there are others).

A workplace learning example that could be structured similarly is crisis management.  Here the manager needs to control all the elements in the scenario rather as one might in a game of chess.  The crisis is characterized as the antagonist and the manager needs to manage it by moving the pieces on the board as it were.  Like a sports movie there will be antagonistic elements, such as an angry person who refuses to fall into line, but they are not the antagonist, they are just an element of it.

The other day I watched Eddie the Eagle with my 6-year-old boy.  It’s a movie about the British no-hoper who, against all the odds, got into the Olympics as a ski jumper.  I found it interesting that his route to the Olympics was in stages based on the size of the ski jumps he could tackle.  These are rather like learning points which became plot points in the story.  As a result, I learned quite a bit about the size of the jumps and other technical details.  But, of course, the thing I remember best is the moral of the story, which is that it’s not about winning it’s about playing, and if you set yourself against the odds people will appreciate your valiant efforts.  So, it affected me as a very anti-sport person, as rather effective pro-sport propaganda.  And for a few days I remembered something of the technicalities of the sport as well.

Coming back to goodies and baddies – one reason we don’t want passionate, violent clashes in our workplace dramas is that we don’t want them in the workplace.  On the other hand, if we were to take a workplace topic, something people are unlikely to get passionate about, and pump it up to the level of a melodrama, we’d have a very entertaining film which no-one would think for a moment is based in reality, but the audience would love it and would no doubt remember it and tell their friends.


Real Drama for Learning

Script consultancy: we work with your team to turn workaday content into something truly dramatic.

Training:  Using our conceptual toolkit, we work with your team to give an understanding of the basics of dramatic construction.

Agency support: working with you at the bid stage, we provide creative support to elevate your video-oriented eLearning idea into a winning pitch.

Production: From idea to final film we work with you throughout the journey.

 

Real Drama for Learning – using emotion to communicate ideas.
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Cake: Why Drama is Good for Learning

Posted by Tom Hickmore, 23rd June, 2017
video drama, video know-how, video production

Stories take impersonal facts and give them meaning. While Drama is not designed to deliver the level of detail you might find in a documentary style treatment, the impact, the engagement and the retention of the message will be much better.


Real Drama for Learning

Script consultancy: we work with your team to turn workaday content into something truly dramatic.

Training:  Using our conceptual toolkit, we work with your team to give an understanding of the basics of dramatic construction.

Agency support: working with you at the bid stage, we provide creative support to elevate your video-oriented eLearning idea into a winning pitch.

Production: From idea to final film we work with you throughout the journey.

Real Drama for Learning – using emotion to communicate ideas.
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Why Drama for Learning?

Posted by Tom Hickmore, 30th May, 2017
video drama, video know-how

Relax and watch the TV

Why does Eastenders have more appeal to a broader audience than Horizon or Panorama? The answer is – you don’t need to use your intellect to engage with drama. And it’s easier to get emotionally involved than it is to get intellectually involved. It’s easier to eat comfort food than it is to eat celery. But unlike a righteous diet regime, with drama you can have your cake and eat it! Drama can deliver messages that have intellectual concepts bound up in them. And while we can’t do that with the sort of detail you’d get from a documentary style treatment, the impact, the engagement and the retention of the message will be much better.

Write a story

Drama is a form of storytelling. Storytelling is a learning buzzword, but why is it so important in learning? Story takes facts, events or ideas and shapes them to create meaning.

St. Paul has been called a spin doctor. It’s meant as a compliment. Paul had extraordinary literary skill which he used to reshape the disparate and sometimes contradictory records of Jesus’ life. He also had the political skill to get his interpretation of the gospels accepted by the church. Paul and his followers wrote vast tracts of the bible post-Jesus, ensuring that a coherent and engaging story was told. This work played a major part in ensuring that Christianity became such a compelling and powerful force in the world. Here, story was the vehicle to spread ideas. Ideas with a spiritual, social and political impact. *

From the sublime to the ridiculous – Keeping up with the Kardashians is another example of the power of story. In this worldwide franchise, the jolly antics of this A-list family look spontaneous and genuine on the surface, but are in fact coordinated and staged by a team of story specialists. “Real” events are framed with staged activities to form stories. Stories that project values, have archetypal characters, plot points, acts and all the rest.

People want stories and want to believe in stories. It’s the principle way that hearts and minds are won and how political change is affected.

Dramatize it!

Most mornings I listen to the Today show on Radio 4 in which John Humphries interviews politicians. The core of his technique is to rhetorically question the position of his interviewee – testing the strength of an argument by trying to demolish it. This format brings out the best in the speaker as they are forced to defend their position. We get the passion and we get to the nub of their argument.

If the BBC let politicians simply tell us what they want us to hear without cross-examination it’d be like listening to a party-political broadcast, and as such, ironically, a lot less engaging and believable.

The latter is what we have seen many a time in a corporate learning drama – characters speaking the company line, showing no passion, and not getting into arguments over the issues. It gets the message across, but it’s not engaging and not convincing either. Of course, most large organisations are understandably wary of depicting their staff as being in conflict with one another, less still argumentative and they’re probably a bit wary of showing passion.

So, it’s our job to carefully guide them past these concerns, to bring in depictions of conflict so their messages can be convincingly delivered. An understanding of the principles of drama can give us the confidence to do this. To sell the client’s idea in a drama you need a champion of that idea (protagonist) and someone who tries to shoot it down (the antagonist). Together, their dialogue allows you to deliver a corporate message with passion and credibility.

Real Drama for Learning

The result of this approach is Real Drama for Learning. Dramatic content that’s as relaxing as watching your favourite TV show. A treat for the learner, a boon for the L&D manager.

Real Drama for Learning – we need it!

* Thanks to the Rev. Ruth Thomas for her Christian review of this paragraph.


Real Drama for Learning

Script consultancy: we work with your team to turn workaday content into something truly dramatic.

Training:  Using our conceptual toolkit, we work with your team to give an understanding of the basics of dramatic construction.

Agency support: working with you at the bid stage, we provide creative support to elevate your video-oriented eLearning idea into a winning pitch.

Production: From idea to final film we work with you throughout the journey.

 

Real Drama for Learning – using emotion to communicate ideas.
Read More

Real Drama for Learning

Posted by Tom Hickmore, 27th April, 2017
elearning, news, script writing, video drama, video know-how

To launch our Real Drama for Learning campaign we produced this fun little video to explain what it’s all about. We entrusted the task of guiding you through the main points to that most talented of creative directors Mr Zach Forsythe. Take it away Zach!

For the exposition on the topic check out Tom Hickmore’s blog here.


Real Drama for Learning

Script consultancy: we work with your team to turn workaday content into something truly dramatic.

Training:  Using our conceptual toolkit, we work with your team to give an understanding of the basics of dramatic construction.

Agency support: working with you at the bid stage, we provide creative support to elevate your video-oriented eLearning idea into a winning pitch.

Production: From idea to final film we work with you throughout the journey.

Real Drama for Learning – using emotion to communicate ideas.

Real Drama for Learning – an Introduction

Posted by Tom Hickmore, 27th April, 2017
elearning, news, video drama, video know-how

Why do we need Real Drama for Learning?

Whenever you see a video with more than one actor in it you expect it to be a drama. When it isn’t you are disappointed.

This is what prompted us to launch our Real Drama for Learning initiative. So often we have seen, so often we have made little films with actors in which they act out workplace scenes, but these scenes have no dramatic structure. It doesn’t matter how well they are filmed and acted they are never going to grab you. If the scenarios and scripts were created by dramatists the videos would cost the same to film and edit, but the results would be a lot more engaging.

But is drama really appropriate in a learning video? We’re not making entertainment.

Apart from the fact that many self-respecting learning agencies talk of aspiring to make content that compares with popular entertainment, we believe that drama is one of the most powerful forms of learning. Here’s why:

Drama is the technique of telling a story with actors. When we tell a story we give meaning to impersonal facts. The meaning makes the facts sticky to our memories. A story ends with a moral that ties up all the meaning into one little package. It’s the punchline that says “I told you so”: The boy who cried wolf is eaten; the Terminator gives his life to save John Connor, Rick gives up Ilsa and goes off to fight the Nazis.

These are glamourous and fantastic examples, but any human activity no matter how everyday can be food for drama, it only need be interesting enough for there to be more than one opinion about it.

Can we fix it?

Nice Media has set out to create a conceptual toolkit, distillations of classic technique to help learning designers to design and write drama. Subjects include – how to design characters, character functions, protagonist and antagonist, how to turn learning points into plot points, how to handle exposition and story structure. It may take a lifetime to become a dramatist, but with moderate effort anyone can learn the basics of dramatic storytelling.

Still in the dark?

To make it clear what we’re going on about here’s an example. How might we dramatize the management of sickness absence? Start at the extremes to leverage emotion. One extreme is Brian – an employee who shows no signs of illness, but is chronically off sick. This immediately suggests two potential extreme reactions – over-empathy and total lack of empathy. One character thinks the absentee is a lazy rotter and the other really feels his pain. Make these two people the business owner, Theresa, and the HR manager, Lucy. Theresa and Lucy are the antagonist and protagonist, (with Brian Lucy’s sidekick). They both want the same thing, to get Brian back to work, but disagree on how it should be achieved. Now, at the passing of every procedural step, Lucy clashes with Theresa and Brian’s feelings are bounced around in front of us. In each clash we traverse the attitudes, concerns and delicacies of what is going on as the issues are tackled in this conflictual structure. The issues are alive with emotion. After the screws of procedural pressure are turned up to the max on Brian, he blurts out that he can’t come back to work because, as a gay man he feels discriminated against. It turns out that Theresa has allowed the development of an intolerant company culture. The revelation saves the company and gets Brian back to work and productive.

The sexual identity bit of the story could be anything else that the company needs to know about itself that could cause a prolonged absence such as childcare issues, bullying or a bad manager.

This happy ending provides the “story proof” and the moral that the procedures, while difficult for all, are the best way to ensure a good outcome.

The way ahead.

This is the first in a series of articles and videos in which we will share our conceptual toolkit and help you and your team to write better drama.

If you have a set of learning points you’d like to dramatize send them to us as a challenge and we’ll see what we can do.


Real Drama for Learning

Script consultancy: we work with your team to turn workaday content into something truly dramatic.

Training:  Using our conceptual toolkit, we work with your team to give an understanding of the basics of dramatic construction.

Agency support: working with you at the bid stage, we provide creative support to elevate your video-oriented eLearning idea into a winning pitch.

Production: From idea to final film we work with you throughout the journey.

Real Drama for Learning – using emotion to communicate ideas.

Clients

City
Brightwave
Marshall E-learning
NHS
Canon
Tesco

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